Select Page

Best and Worst Places to Live For Dry Eyes

While dry eyes can strike anyone at any time in any location, there are some places that are simply more likely to see victims suffer from dry eye problems than others.  In general, places that are located in very high altitudes or have hot and dry climates are the most likely places to see large numbers of dry eye sufferers.

Fortunately, TheraLife can help your dry eye problems no matter where you live. If you are suffering from chronic dry eyes, read on to learn more.

High Altitude and Dry Eyes

While the coastal areas of the United States often lie at or slightly above sea level, there are many locations throughout the country that are at very high altitudes.  Examples of very high altitude locations in the United States include:

  • Leadville, CO—10,152 feet.  At more than 10,000 feet above sea level, Leadville is officially the highest city in the United States.  Some parts of the town around Winter Park climb to more than 12,000 feet.
  • Brian Head, UT—9,800 feet.  With the Town Offices elevated more than 9,500 feet, Brian Head is one of the nation’s highest permanent settlements.
  • Taos Ski Valley, NM—9,321 feet.  Taos is a popular ski resort that lies well above 9,000 feet above sea level.
  • Greer, AZ—8,356 feet.  This unincorporated town, located in the White Mountains of Arizona, is a small city but still populated year-round.

High altitude seems to contribute to dry eyes in two ways.  First, the air pressure decreases as you climb higher, which means that it is harder to get oxygen into your lungs and through your body.  As your body struggles to compensate, all extraneous body functions, including producing tears, tend to decrease.

Second, at high altitude, less atmospheric pressure, the air is drier, less moisture.  Liquids evaporate faster because the boiling point of liquids is lower when atmospheric pressure decrease.  Tear tends to evaporate quickly, and your body has to produce more tears to keep up.

Hot, Dry Climates and Dry Eyes

People who live in hot, dry climates may also experience problems with dry eyes.  The desert communities in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada are good examples of this type of climate, where daytime temperatures can climb to nearly 115º F and where average rainfall is less than 10 inches per year. 

The lack of humidity in the air, rather than the temperature itself, is what makes this type of climate so unforgiving to those with dry eyes.

Best climate for Sjogren’s Syndrome

Sjogren’s syndrome is an autoimmune disease where chronic dry eye, dry mouth, are hallmark symptoms. Best places for live for Sjogren’s syndrome would be a mild climate with a high humidity climate.

For example, California for the mild climate and use humidifiers in doors. Florida for high humidity during fall and winter months.

Caution in using artificial tears for dry eye relieve

The first line of defense for dry eye is artificial tears, or eye drops. It is well established that frequent use of eye drops make your eyes drier. Artificial tears wash away the natural lubricants your eyes produce making your eyes drier. This applies to eye drops that are preservative free, gel eye drops and artificial tears that takes the red out.

How TheraLife can help

If you suffer from dry eyes and live in a high altitude or hot, desert climate, you must take steps to treat and maintain the tear production in your eyes to avoid possible injury and damage.

TheraLife treats tear production problems at the source, solving dry eye issues for you no matter where you live or under what climatic conditions.  This is the ultimate oral dry eye treatment.  When eye drops don’t work.  Come to TheraLife. 

dry eyes treatment

Learn where to live if you have dry eyes. Get help now

Customer stories from TheraLife

Severe Chronic Dry Eyes- Relief by TheraLife Eye,

I’m 48 years old and have suffered from dry eyes for six years. I tried everything. Nothing seemed to work for me.
I was very skeptical about this product since nothing seemed to work for me.

But I was amazed by this treatment. After two weeks, my eyes were feeling so much better. The pain was gone, my eyes were not nearly as dry, and even the redness improved.

I recommend this product to anyone that suffers from dry eyes.
Thank you TheraLife for making a product that actually works.

D. G. United States

For more stories, click here

Visit us today to learn how we can help you with your dry eye problems.

References

1.Farrand KF, Fridman M, Stillman IÖ, Schaumberg DA. Prevalence of diagnosed dry eye disease in the United States among adults aged 18 years and older. Am J Ophthalmol. 2017; 182: 90–98. 

2.Lemp MA. Epidemiology and classification of dry eye. Adv Exp Med Biol. 1998; 438: 791–803. 

3.Moss SE, Klein R, Klein BE. Prevalence of and risk factors for dry eye syndrome. Arch Ophthalmol. 2000; 118: 1264–1268 

4.Miljanović B, Dana R, Sullivan DA, Schaumberg DA. Impact of dry eye syndrome on vision-related quality of life. Am J Ophthalmol. 2007; 143: 409–415. 

5.Yu J, Asche CV, Fairchild CJ. The economic burden of dry eye disease in the United States: a decision tree analysis. Cornea. 2011; 30: 379–387.

6.Farrand KF, Fridman M, Stillman IÖ, Schaumberg DA. Prevalence of diagnosed dry eye disease in the United States among adults aged 18 years and older. Am J Ophthalmol. 2017; 182: 90–98.

7.Lemp MA. Epidemiology and classification of dry eye. Adv Exp Med Biol. 1998; 438: 791–803. 

8.Moss SE, Klein R, Klein BE. Prevalence of and risk factors for dry eye syndrome. Arch Ophthalmol. 2000; 118: 1264–1268 

9.Miljanović B, Dana R, Sullivan DA, Schaumberg DA. Impact of dry eye syndrome on vision-related quality of life. Am J Ophthalmol. 2007; 143: 409–415. 

10.Yu J, Asche CV, Fairchild CJ. The economic burden of dry eye disease in the United States: a decision tree analysis. Cornea. 2011; 30: 379–387. 

11.Versura P, Profazio V, Cellini M, Torreggiani A, Caramazza R. Eye discomfort and air pollution. Ophthalmologica. 1999; 213: 103–109. 

12.Sahai A, Malik P. Dry eye: prevalence and attributable risk factors in a hospital-based population. Indian J Ophthalmol. 2005; 53: 87–91. 

13.Galor A, Kumar N, Feuer W, Lee DJ. Environmental factors affect the risk of dry eye syndrome in a United States veteran population. Ophthalmology. 2014; 121: 972–983. 

14.Hwang SH, Choi YH, Paik HJ, et al. Potential importance of ozone in the association between outdoor air pollution and dry eye disease in South Korea. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2016; 134: 503–510. 

15.Torricelli AA, Matsuda M, Novaes P, et al. Effects of ambient levels of traffic-derived air pollution on the ocular surface: analysis of symptoms, conjunctival goblet cell count and mucin 5AC gene expression. Environ Res. 2014; 131: 59–63. 

16.Abusharha AA, Pearce EI. The effect of low humidity on the human tear film. Cornea. 2013; 32: 429–434. 

17.World Health Organization. Air Quality Guidelines: Global Update 2005: Particulate Matter, Ozone, Nitrogen Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2006.

18.Di Q, Dai L, Wang Y, et al. Association of short-term exposure to air pollution with mortality in older adults. JAMA. 2017; 318: 2446–2456. 

19.US Environmental Protection Agency. Remote sensing information gateway. Available at: https://www.epa.gov/rsig . Accessed June 1, 2017.

20.Moss SE, Klein R, Klein BE. Prevalence of and risk factors for dry eye syndrome. Arch Ophthalmol. 2000; 118: 1264–1268. 

21.Lee AJ, Lee J, Saw SM, et al. Prevalence and risk factors associated with dry eye symptoms: a population based study in Indonesia. Br J Ophthalmol. 2002; 86: 1347–1351. 

22.Dry Eye Assessment and Management Study Research Group, Asbell PA, Maguire MG, et al. n-3 Fatty acid supplementation for the treatment of dry eye disease. N Engl J Med. 2018; 378: 1681–1690. 

23.12-Item Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) Administration and Scoring Manual . Irvine, CA: Allergan; 2004.

24.Schiffman RM, Christianson MD, Jacobsen G, Hirsch JD, Reis BL. Reliability and validity of the Ocular Surface Disease Index. Arch Ophthalmol. 2000; 118: 615–621. 

25.World Medical Association. World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects. JAMA. 2013; 310: 2191–2194.

26.Asbell PA, Maguire MG, Peskin E, et al. Dry Eye Assessment and Management (DREAM©) study: study design and baseline characteristics. Contemp Clin Trials. 2018; 71: 70–79. 

27.NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. NCEI map application—local climatological data map. Available at: https://gis.ncdc.noaa.gov/maps/. Accessed December 2, 2018.

28.Kottek M, Grieser J, Beck C, et al. World map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification updated. Meteorol Z. 2006; 15: 259–263.

29.González-García MJ, González-Sáiz A, de la Fuente B, et al. Exposure to a controlled adverse environment impairs the ocular surface of subjects with minimally symptomatic dry eye. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2007; 48: 4026–4032. 

30.Calonge M, Labetoulle M, Messmer EM, et al. Controlled adverse environment chambers in dry eye research. Curr Eye Res. 2018; 43: 445–450.

 

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest